Convocatoria abierta de la primera Revista Científica La Ciudad Viva, bajo la temática: “DERECHO A LA VIVIENDA, DERECHO A LA CIUDAD: Vivienda y Parque público; Rehabilitación energética y Reactivación urbana.” Dicha Convocatoria finaliza el próximo 20 de Junio
Open call until 20th June

Convocatoria abierta de la primera Revista Científica La Ciudad Viva, bajo la temática: “DERECHO A LA VIVIENDA, DERECHO A LA CIUDAD: Vivienda y Parque público; Rehabilitación energética y Reactivación urbana.” Dicha Convocatoria finaliza el próximo 20 de Junio

Open call until 20th June

How Cities Work

tetw:

A Tetw reading list

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Downtown is for People by Jane Jacobs - This classic 1958 article about the follies of large-scale urban planning reads like it was written yesterday.

A Physicist Solves the City by Jonah Lehrer - “We spend all this time thinking about cities in terms of their local details, their restaurants and museums and weather. I had this hunch that there was something more, that every city was also shaped by a set of hidden laws.”

Designs For Working by Malcolm Gladwell - A manifesto for the perfect workspace that has as much to say about urban geography as it does about laying out an office.

Long Live the Industrial City by Tom Vanderbilt - Why manufacturing remains central to the creative life of the city, even in the age of international outsourcing.

The City Solution by Robert Kunzig - Why cities are the best cure for our planet’s growing pains.

American Murder Mystery by Hanna Rosin - Why is crime rising in so many American cities? The answer implicates one of the most celebrated antipoverty programs of recent decades.

Burning Man and the Metropolis by Nate Berg (via Longform.org) - How to build a city in the middle of the desert, and then make it disappear.

Sardine Life by Justin Davidson (via Longform.org) - The ins and outs (and ups and downs) of vertical living.

The Social Life of Small Urban Places by William H. Whyte - Okay, Okay, it’s a film… but a really good one.

The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving
by Leigh Gallagher 

The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving

by Leigh Gallagher 

June-July posts on Ciudades a Escala Humana

 

@manufernandez

creativemornings:

August’s Global Theme is “Urbanism”
Last month, 55 CreativeMornings chapters came together for a global conversation around the topic of “Space.” This August, we’re excited to announce our next theme: “Urbanism.” The theme was chosen by our Stockholm organizer Richard Feigin and skilled Stockholm-based illustrator Marcus Gunnar Pettersson created our monthly illustration.
Speakers are delving into all aspects of urbanism and how we interact with our built environment: such as George and Sarah Aye of Greater Good Studio, who use design to solve social problems (Chicago), to Adam Gebrián, well-known “architect who never built anything” (Prague). From collecting a city’s stories to building collaborative ecosystems, talks from this month will make you think hard about the city you inhabit and the role you play.
To find an August event near you, check out creativemornings.com, or follow your local chapter on Twitter. As always, tickets are free and available starting the Monday before the talk.
We’ll see you there!

creativemornings:

August’s Global Theme is “Urbanism”

Last month, 55 CreativeMornings chapters came together for a global conversation around the topic of “Space.” This August, we’re excited to announce our next theme: “Urbanism.” The theme was chosen by our Stockholm organizer Richard Feigin and skilled Stockholm-based illustrator Marcus Gunnar Pettersson created our monthly illustration.

Speakers are delving into all aspects of urbanism and how we interact with our built environment: such as George and Sarah Aye of Greater Good Studio, who use design to solve social problems (Chicago), to Adam Gebrián, well-known “architect who never built anything” (Prague). From collecting a city’s stories to building collaborative ecosystems, talks from this month will make you think hard about the city you inhabit and the role you play.

To find an August event near you, check out creativemornings.com, or follow your local chapter on Twitter. As always, tickets are free and available starting the Monday before the talk.

We’ll see you there!

(Source: creativemornings)

untappedcities:

Living Activism at the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space in NYC’s East Village http://bit.ly/1agEiMu

untappedcities:

Living Activism at the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space in NYC’s East Village http://bit.ly/1agEiMu

Brickstarter the book contains 80 dense pages filled with the research presented here, refined and reformatted, as well as entirely new essays and illustrations. This book is a primer for people working on problems at the intersection of crowdfunding/sourcing, social media, urban planning and decision-making. So in other words, it’s about contemporary cities and how we might create new platforms to enable more effective debate about the future of our shared spaces.

Brickstarter the book contains 80 dense pages filled with the research presented here, refined and reformatted, as well as entirely new essays and illustrations. This book is a primer for people working on problems at the intersection of crowdfunding/sourcing, social media, urban planning and decision-making. So in other words, it’s about contemporary cities and how we might create new platforms to enable more effective debate about the future of our shared spaces.

Adaptive urbanism is a way to deal with the limits of formal planning. Planning intends to regulate uses and permits with the promise of offering a permanent solution. When a project is planned, there is an expectation that weverything will work fine (schedules and finances, but also final uses and operations). But every urban plan is out of date since it is approved, because circumstances change –and how have they changed in the last five years!- and users and citizens give new uses and behave and interact with the icty in different ways than the expected one. Formal urbanism thinks in terms of projects, material projects as an output. But now that lots of envisaged projects won´t become real for years, it is time to think in a more adaptive ways and give priority to social creativity processes and local networks as the main outcome we have to promote.

Adaptive cities: co-design for social creativity (@manufernandez)
icancauseaconstellation:

Amsterdam, the canal rings

icancauseaconstellation:

Amsterdam, the canal rings

(via taylorgrindley)

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