Social Interaction in Urban Areas

imaginingcities:

Urban areas impact individuals’ relationships with one another. Economic problems and power dynamics are intensified in small spatial areas in which resources are scarce due to dense populations.

Social scientists seek to understand how metropolitan social dynamics are distinct from those in…

What´s the number one thing we could do to improve city life? 

A group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders predict the future of livable, walkable cities. The list includes Luís Bettencourt, Geoffrey West, Alissa Walker, Jeff Speck, and Jennifer Pahlka, among others.

(Source: yuriartibise.com)

mymodernmet:

The Guardian’s Google Street View specialist Halley Docherty has released an incredible new series of images that bring together famous album covers and their modern-day settings. Docherty uses Google Street View to pinpoint the exact location that’s depicted in the album cover, and then meticulously lines up the Street View scene and the album cover so that they blend together seamlessly. The series features albums by iconic artists like Bob Dylan, Oasis, the Beatles, and Led Zeppelin.

(via vidanacidade)

How to Improve City Life [Video]

yuriartibise:

How to Improve City Life [#Video] #cities

At this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival, a group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders were asked to predict the future of livable, walkable cities.

“If I could have one wish for people who live in cities, it’s that we find ways to connect back to nature, to remind [people] that nature isn’t out there—outside the cities—but right in their homes where they live.”M. SanjayanConservation…

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digitalpublicspaces:

Adam Greenfield and smart cities

nevver:

Breathing City

nevver:

Breathing City

(via zuloark)

We own the city (book)

We own the city (book)

The Urban State of Mind: Meditations on the City is the first Urbanophile e-book, featuring provocative essays on the key issues facing our cities, including innovation, talent attraction and brain drain, global soft power, sustainability, economic development, and localism. Included are 28 carefully curated essays out of nearly 1,200 posts in the first seven years of the Urbanophile, plus 9 original pieces. It’s great for anyone who cares about our cities.

The Urban State of Mind: Meditations on the City is the first Urbanophile e-book, featuring provocative essays on the key issues facing our cities, including innovation, talent attraction and brain drain, global soft power, sustainability, economic development, and localism. Included are 28 carefully curated essays out of nearly 1,200 posts in the first seven years of the Urbanophile, plus 9 original pieces. It’s great for anyone who cares about our cities.

Future Cities Catapult seeks ideas on playable, open and configurable cities for £30,000 prize.
More info: Watershed
Pushing the boundaries and encouraging experimentation, this £30,000 international award sits at the intersections of art, technology and culture.

Returning for a second year, Watershed’s Playable City Award challenges artists and creatives from around the world to produce an artwork which engages with the notion of cities as playable, malleable, and idiosyncratic public spaces. We are inviting practitioners from all creative disciplines to propose an original piece of work that will debut in Bristol, UK in 2014 and to go on to tour internationally in 2015.

The Theme

We are interested in supporting future-facing work, which uses creative technology to explore the theme of the playable city.


‘Playable City’ is a new term imagined as a counterpoint to the ‘Smart City’. All over the world governments & tech companies are investing in smart systems for cities, using networks & sensors to join up services & collect data. In these emerging systems, the emphasis is often a drive for efficiency – focussing on solutions with a potential to render our cities as isolated, professionalised places. How instead might we make them more nuanced, open & permissive?

Future Cities Catapult seeks ideas on playable, open and configurable cities for £30,000 prize.

More info: Watershed

Pushing the boundaries and encouraging experimentation, this £30,000 international award sits at the intersections of art, technology and culture.

Returning for a second year, Watershed’s Playable City Award challenges artists and creatives from around the world to produce an artwork which engages with the notion of cities as playable, malleable, and idiosyncratic public spaces. We are inviting practitioners from all creative disciplines to propose an original piece of work that will debut in Bristol, UK in 2014 and to go on to tour internationally in 2015.

The Theme

We are interested in supporting future-facing work, which uses creative technology to explore the theme of the playable city.

‘Playable City’ is a new term imagined as a counterpoint to the ‘Smart City’. All over the world governments & tech companies are investing in smart systems for cities, using networks & sensors to join up services & collect data. In these emerging systems, the emphasis is often a drive for efficiency – focussing on solutions with a potential to render our cities as isolated, professionalised places. How instead might we make them more nuanced, open & permissive?

Adam Magyar - Stainless, 42 Street (excerpt) from Adam Magyar on Vimeo.

Simply amazing!

Adam Magyar - Stainless, 42 Street (excerpt)

Einstein’s Camera How one renegade photographer is hacking the concept of time.

At the time, Magyar was immersed in a long-running techno-art project called Stainless, creating high-resolution images of speeding subway trains and their passengers, using sophisticated software he created and hardware that he retrofitted himself. The scanning technique he developed—combining thousands of pixel-wide slices into a single image—allows him to catch passengers unawares as they hurtle through dark subway tunnels, fixing them in haunting images filled with detail no ordinary camera can capture.

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