Future Cities Catapult seeks ideas on playable, open and configurable cities for £30,000 prize.
More info: Watershed
Pushing the boundaries and encouraging experimentation, this £30,000 international award sits at the intersections of art, technology and culture.

Returning for a second year, Watershed’s Playable City Award challenges artists and creatives from around the world to produce an artwork which engages with the notion of cities as playable, malleable, and idiosyncratic public spaces. We are inviting practitioners from all creative disciplines to propose an original piece of work that will debut in Bristol, UK in 2014 and to go on to tour internationally in 2015.

The Theme

We are interested in supporting future-facing work, which uses creative technology to explore the theme of the playable city.


‘Playable City’ is a new term imagined as a counterpoint to the ‘Smart City’. All over the world governments & tech companies are investing in smart systems for cities, using networks & sensors to join up services & collect data. In these emerging systems, the emphasis is often a drive for efficiency – focussing on solutions with a potential to render our cities as isolated, professionalised places. How instead might we make them more nuanced, open & permissive?

Future Cities Catapult seeks ideas on playable, open and configurable cities for £30,000 prize.

More info: Watershed

Pushing the boundaries and encouraging experimentation, this £30,000 international award sits at the intersections of art, technology and culture.

Returning for a second year, Watershed’s Playable City Award challenges artists and creatives from around the world to produce an artwork which engages with the notion of cities as playable, malleable, and idiosyncratic public spaces. We are inviting practitioners from all creative disciplines to propose an original piece of work that will debut in Bristol, UK in 2014 and to go on to tour internationally in 2015.

The Theme

We are interested in supporting future-facing work, which uses creative technology to explore the theme of the playable city.

‘Playable City’ is a new term imagined as a counterpoint to the ‘Smart City’. All over the world governments & tech companies are investing in smart systems for cities, using networks & sensors to join up services & collect data. In these emerging systems, the emphasis is often a drive for efficiency – focussing on solutions with a potential to render our cities as isolated, professionalised places. How instead might we make them more nuanced, open & permissive?

Simply amazing!

Adam Magyar - Stainless, 42 Street (excerpt)

Einstein’s Camera How one renegade photographer is hacking the concept of time.

At the time, Magyar was immersed in a long-running techno-art project called Stainless, creating high-resolution images of speeding subway trains and their passengers, using sophisticated software he created and hardware that he retrofitted himself. The scanning technique he developed—combining thousands of pixel-wide slices into a single image—allows him to catch passengers unawares as they hurtle through dark subway tunnels, fixing them in haunting images filled with detail no ordinary camera can capture.

wickedtitania:

Today, Security camera clips that make the news usually show bad things, but here, Coke decided to “look at the world a little differently” in this heartwarming viral video. People stealing kisses, harmless soldiers, music addicts, honest pickpockets and potato chip dealers. Love, Attacks of friendship, friendly gangs and kindness. Unexpected firemen, rebels with a cause and peaceful warriors. A lot of crazy people, and a few heroes. 

(via olishaw)

Dear City, Here's Why I Hate You

(Source: theatlanticcities)

(Source: maxdwork.blogspot.co.uk, via jeedgan)

Dissecting some underlying assumptions of the smart city discourse

I have just finished a two-months period writing two articles that will appear soon. 

(…)

It covers a state of the art, but, particularly, a dissection of some underlying myths in that vision (in a few words) and how these risks and misconceptions can lead to disillusionment: 

  • Operational efficiency of local governments as the main objective, confusing the city council with the whole city.
  • Weak use of sustainability claims, without an overall understanding of environmental implications and with poor attention on some background knowledge from urban ecology.
  • Useless simplification of urban complexity.
  • Pretended neutrality of data.
  • Depolitization of urban debates and social conflicts.
  • Technological smugness and over-representation of technology means to address non-technological issues.

Studio-X NYC: Over the past four years, William Helmreich, a sociology professor at...

studiox-nyc:

image

Over the past four years, William Helmreich, a sociology professor at CUNY, has walked every street in New York City except a handful of blocks in Staten Island.

I ended up walking about 6,000 miles, the distance between New York City and Los Angeles and back to New York (4,998 miles), and…

Studio-X NYC: The new issue of Dwell has a nice interview with designer Michael...

studiox-nyc:

The new issue of Dwell has a nice interview with designer Michael Bierut on the development of New York City’s new wayfinding signage.

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Among the interesting snippets: the team developed new symbols and landmark buildings, including a shopping bag that incorporates Milton Glaser’s iconic…

yuriartibise:

Book Review: Good Urbanism — Six Steps to Creating Prosperous Places


In cities around the world, a consensus is developing among urban planners, placemakers and…

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yuriartibise:

Book Review: Good Urbanism — Six Steps to Creating Prosperous Places

In cities around the world, a consensus is developing among urban planners, placemakers and…

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