Amazing! Visualizing what is the fastest mode of transport in different cities? by @youarehereMIT

Amazing! Visualizing what is the fastest mode of transport in different cities? by @youarehereMIT

Call for Chapters Contributing to a Book on Technology and Urban Mobility

Extended Deadline: June 15th, 2014.

Working Book Title: Information Technology Solutions for Urban Mobility.

Collaborating Organizations:

The National Confederation of Municipalities - CNM Brazil is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit national association of municipalities. It aims to consolidate the municipal movement and strengthen local autonomy by developing political and technical initiatives towards enhancing local management.

The University of Michigan SMART is a cross-university, cross-disciplinary, multi-sector initiative focused on accelerating implementation of integrated, sustainable transportation systems (new Mobility) and the related emerging New Mobility industry for an urbanizing

Objectives: This book is aimed at exploring and showcasing how information technology solutions can be used to support the adoption of a more integrated and efficient urban mobility, especially in small and medium sized municipalities in Brazil, which make up a major part of the Brazilian territory. It seeks to compile papers geared to municipal officials, the private sector and civil society, with examples of the use of information technology solutions for urban mobility. It is anticipated that the book will illustrate Brazilian and international experiences which will inspire the implementation and development of new and applied solutions in different municipalities. The selected authors will be challenged to describe the process of development of these initiatives, the results achieved, and the difficulties faced. They will also address the role of partnerships in achieving success. The chapters will be selected by a collaborative team representing CNM and SMART. The main focus of the book is on solutions implemented in municipalities with a population of up to 300,000, not excluding solutions from large cities, which could be transferable. The technological areas covered are diverse, including data collection (“Big Data”), planning for urban mobility, apps for improving the existing transportation systems (including traffic management, way finding, fare payment, security, goods movement, trip reduction through tele-work, tele-commerce, tele-education and tele-medicine etc) user access, and other relevant topics.

Format: In Word. 8 to 10 pages long, including illustrations and bibliography. Font: Calibri 11. 1.5 line spacing.

Selection process: To participate, please send your paper to internacional@cnm.org.br with “CNM-SMART Paper” in the subject line by June 15th, 2014 (11 pm Brasilia Time).

For additional information, contact us by e-mail: internacional@cnm.org.br

fastcompany:

With almost $1 billion in funding and ambitions to replace petroleum-based cars with a network of cheap electrics, Shai Agassi’s Better Place was remarkable even by the standards of world-changing startups. So was its epic failure.
READ MORE ›

fastcompany:

With almost $1 billion in funding and ambitions to replace petroleum-based cars with a network of cheap electrics, Shai Agassi’s Better Place was remarkable even by the standards of world-changing startups. So was its epic failure.

READ MORE ›

atlurbanist:

The number of people a 3.5 meter wide lane can convey in an hour, by transport mode.
We’ve inherited a lot of inefficient, car-centric places from previous decades, but we don’t have to keep building that way. In Atlanta, with the Beltline and MARTA’s TOD projects and more, there’s new interest in building places that are centered around other transportation modes.

atlurbanist:

The number of people a 3.5 meter wide lane can convey in an hour, by transport mode.

We’ve inherited a lot of inefficient, car-centric places from previous decades, but we don’t have to keep building that way. In Atlanta, with the Beltline and MARTA’s TOD projects and more, there’s new interest in building places that are centered around other transportation modes.

sustainingthemomentum:

Two transport revolutions in the Netherlands - a quick video showing the two major changes in road infrastructure mentality in the Netherlands from the beginning of the 20th Century to the beginning of the 21st Century - from narrow, cobbled streets dominated by horses and pedestrians, to automobile-ruled asphalt expanses, to slow and pleasant streets dominated by pedestrians and cyclists again.

The United Kingdom should take some tips from this mentality of prioritising streets as places to live and not through-routes - we would benefit massively as a result.

digitalurbanisms:

(via This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It - Emily Badger - The Atlantic Cities)

digitalurbanisms:

(via This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It - Emily Badger - The Atlantic Cities)

(Source: carlburton, via goingurban)

theatlanticcities:

Watch the dramatic makeover of New York City’s streets.

(Source: thisiscitylab)

urbangeographies:

WATERFRONT REVITALIZATION:  The case for removal of elevated expressways!

As cities around the world consider how to revitalization their aging and often deteriorated waterfronts, increasingly planners increasingly consider the removal of unsightly elevated expressways and the construction of new pedestrian and bicycle-friendly boulevards and parkways. For example, Chicago is now beginning to plan the redesign of North Lake Shore Drive, one of the great city’s most iconic arteries, and the city’s Active Transportation Alliance (ATA) and other groups are calling for a bold vision to redesign the urban landscape. The ATA’s instructive review of what Chicago can learn from San Francisco’s reconstruction of its historic Embarcadero is worth reading! See it here…

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