Ciudad y tecnología. Participación ciudadana en la sociedad conectada from Manu Fernández

Ciudad y tecnología. Participación ciudadana en la sociedad conectada 

El viernes pasado tuve la oportunidad de participar en la sesión inicial del curso de verano de la Universidad de Cantabria Nuevas tecnologías y participación ciudadana, un nuevo contexto para la gestión de la ciudad. Planteé la intervención bajo el título Ciudad y tecnología. Participación ciudadana en la sociedad conectada con la idea de hacer una aproximación crítica, realista y constructiva sobre el nuevo escenario de incidencia ciudadana en los asuntos públicos relacionados con la vida urbana.

Cities in a smarter world 

This is a short article Universitat Oberta de Catalunya asked me some weeks ago. It has been posted  on their blog Open Thoughts 2013 and especifically in their series Ready for a smarter world? 

Cities in a smarter world 

This is a short article Universitat Oberta de Catalunya asked me some weeks ago. It has been posted  on their blog Open Thoughts 2013 and especifically in their series Ready for a smarter world? 

Digital Intelligence 2014 call for papers (extended deadine: May 16)

Digital Intelligence 2014 call for papers (extended deadine: May 16)

“FROM FAB LABS TO FAB CITIES” (2-8 July 2014, Barcelona)
Fab10 Barcelona is the tenth international conference and annual meeting of the Fab Lab network. Fab10 Barcelona will gather the international Fab Lab community from more than 150 laboratories based in more than 40 countries, who share tools, projects, programs and processes in an open and collaborative philosophy.

“FROM FAB LABS TO FAB CITIES” (2-8 July 2014, Barcelona)

Fab10 Barcelona is the tenth international conference and annual meeting of the Fab Lab network. Fab10 Barcelona will gather the international Fab Lab community from more than 150 laboratories based in more than 40 countries, who share tools, projects, programs and processes in an open and collaborative philosophy.

About Thingful
Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.
Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

About Thingful

Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.

Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

Smart cities in present tense - Notes from my talk at #reworkcities (London, December 13th)
(…)
I brought to the table three main ideas:

Technology alone is not the enough and this basic premise, which seems so obvious, is not well embedded in the smart city narrative, I will explain it later.
There´s no need to wait for smart cities to happen or for others to let people transform the city with their own hands. 
We need to raise questions and have a critical mindset on the implications of these technologies.
(…)

Smart cities in present tense - Notes from my talk at #reworkcities (London, December 13th)

(…)

I brought to the table three main ideas:

  • Technology alone is not the enough and this basic premise, which seems so obvious, is not well embedded in the smart city narrative, I will explain it later.
  • There´s no need to wait for smart cities to happen or for others to let people transform the city with their own hands. 
  • We need to raise questions and have a critical mindset on the implications of these technologies.

(…)

RE.WORK Cities: Challenges for Integration

Hosted by Scott Cain, Start-Up Director of the Future Cities Catapult, the session includes 5-minute ‘food for thought’ presentations from leading city experts:

Andrew Hudson-Smith, University College London -  ‘Realtime Data, Augmented and Virtual Reality mixed with The Internet of Things: Towards the Smart Citizen and ultimately a Smart City’
Paula Hirst, Disruptive Urbanism -  ‘Incentives for Collaboration’
Manu Fernandez, Human Scale City –‘Forget the Smart Cities of the Future: It is Happening Now’
Lean Doody, Arup – ‘ICT, Smart Cities & Citizen Behaviour ‘

RE.WORK Cities: Challenges for Integration

Hosted by Scott Cain, Start-Up Director of the Future Cities Catapult, the session includes 5-minute ‘food for thought’ presentations from leading city experts:

Andrew Hudson-Smith, University College London -  ‘Realtime Data, Augmented and Virtual Reality mixed with The Internet of Things: Towards the Smart Citizen and ultimately a Smart City’

Paula Hirst, Disruptive Urbanism -  ‘Incentives for Collaboration’

Manu Fernandez, Human Scale City –‘Forget the Smart Cities of the Future: It is Happening Now

Lean Doody, Arup – ‘ICT, Smart Cities & Citizen Behaviour ‘

Institute for the Future is about to launch a new website on the makers movement and cities, a crowdsourced forecasting game that challenges everyone to imagine their own city as a Maker City in the year 2025.

Institute for the Future is about to launch a new website on the makers movement and cities, a crowdsourced forecasting game that challenges everyone to imagine their own city as a Maker City in the year 2025.

The Human Smart Cities Manifesto | Peripheria

Human Smart Cities are those where governments engage citizens by being open to be engaged by citizens, supporting the co-design of technical and social innovation processes through a peer-to-peer relationship based on reciprocal trust and collaboration. The Human Smart City is a city where people – citizens and communities – are the main actors of urban “smartness”. A Human Smart City adopts services that are born from people’s real needs and have been co-designed through interactive, dialogic, and collaborative processes.

In a Human Smart City, people are not obliged to adopt technologies that have been selected and purchased by their municipal governments; they rather are encouraged to compose their own services using available technologies in simple, often frugal solutions. Co-creation initiatives at the heart of the Human Smart City concept also stimulate local development, creating new business models and new apps, products, services and solutions. Indeed, the solutions for the big challenges of our time require not only innovative technologies but, above all, mass behaviour transformation of the kind that can only be achieved through the involvement of people. Through the appropriate governance of social and technical innovation and the integration of Future Internet technologies, Living Labs and Social Innovation, the Human Smart Cities vision aims to build on a new sense of belonging and identity, wellbeing and community, to shape a better and happier society.

The promise of a new science of cities and big data as the new gold rush that will fuel urban management. But we should remember cities are complex systems, with a mess of people, subsystems, services, infrastructures, interests, conflicts,…Are cities really a giant math equation? Is it possible to capture all their variables and turn urban management into a formal, quantitative, deterministic and automated system?
I don´t think so.

Smart cities: urban innovation and civic engagement in a networked society (@manufernandez)
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