drawingnothing:

I thought this was interesting. What surface parking lots did to Cleaveland’s warehouse district (which is a nationally recognized historic district, oops). 
1960s vs today.
Shit like this needs to stop but you still see it happening even today in cities around the country. What a sad waste.

As seen here

drawingnothing:

I thought this was interesting. What surface parking lots did to Cleaveland’s warehouse district (which is a nationally recognized historic district, oops). 

1960s vs today.

Shit like this needs to stop but you still see it happening even today in cities around the country. What a sad waste.

As seen here

How A Giant Mall Parking Lot Turned Into A Park And A Walkable Community

pblakelawson:

Great. Looks great too.

copenfuckinghagen:

This is Park Where You Want DELUXE! #copenhagen #parkwhereyouwant #Urbanism

copenfuckinghagen:

This is Park Where You Want DELUXE! #copenhagen #parkwhereyouwant #Urbanism

memoriastoica:

Dodger Stadium construction in three stages.

Circa 1960.

(via zuloark)

theatlanticcities:

Looking for a parking spot in downtown Detroit? No problem. According to one local planner, nearly 40 percent of downtown is dedicated to parking.
Not surprisingly, the metro area has one of the lowest shares of workers who commute by public transit. Detroit also has the highest percentage of commuters who drive to work alone (84.2 percent).
Read: How Too Much Parking Strangled the Motor City
[Graphic: Rob Linn]

theatlanticcities:

Looking for a parking spot in downtown Detroit? No problem. According to one local planner, nearly 40 percent of downtown is dedicated to parking.

Not surprisingly, the metro area has one of the lowest shares of workers who commute by public transit. Detroit also has the highest percentage of commuters who drive to work alone (84.2 percent).

Read: How Too Much Parking Strangled the Motor City

[Graphic: Rob Linn]

urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco

Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.
The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 
Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.

Cars are parked 95% of the time

citymaus:

“Most people in transportation focus on the five percent of the time that cars are moving. But the average car is parked 95 percent of the time. I think there’s a lot to learn from that 95 percent.” Donald Shoup when asked why he studies parking.

(via urban-words)

(Source: elikz, via architorture)

Parking lots in suburban malls epitomise why we really need to rethink parking in a clever way. They have been traditionally designed to accommodate the maximum number of clients in their peak times (which means that most of the time are under-utilized). But this mono-functional zoning has been applied in car parks around the corporate headquarters of large companies outside of cities or industrial and technology parks: And, of course, every sidewalk of street roads must dedicate space for parking.

Adaptive urbanism. Rethinking parking

pli1018:

New York City car park form 1920. They definitely had a vertical obsession back then.

pli1018:

New York City car park form 1920. They definitely had a vertical obsession back then.

(via urbanination)

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