dreamsforthecity:

thisbigcity:

lyndseyscofield:

Part of a bicycle safety campaign by Metro in Los Angeles. Separated bike lanes and bike signals are important, but I don’t discount the positive effect of more signage and awareness. I’d love to see more of these everywhere! 

'Every lanes a bike lane.' Don’t we wish!

SInce moving to a small Midwestern non-bike/pedestrian friendly city I have wanted to put these signs up everywhere. I a single month I’ve had people tell me to “get on the sidewalk,” and “you shouldn’t do that, it’s dangerous.” The cycling culture here seems to be relatively restricted to those who don’t have cars and the sight of a young, well-dressed woman on a bike makes people nervous. 
People here also do not stop for pedestrians. A friend and I were in the middle of a crosswalk (one that had no light associated with us) and traffic did not stop, despite the fact that we were standing in the middle of the road. I’ve seen this happen on multiple occasions. I can’t wait to live in a real city again someday.

dreamsforthecity:

thisbigcity:

lyndseyscofield:

Part of a bicycle safety campaign by Metro in Los Angeles. Separated bike lanes and bike signals are important, but I don’t discount the positive effect of more signage and awareness. I’d love to see more of these everywhere! 

'Every lanes a bike lane.'
Don’t we wish!

SInce moving to a small Midwestern non-bike/pedestrian friendly city I have wanted to put these signs up everywhere. I a single month I’ve had people tell me to “get on the sidewalk,” and “you shouldn’t do that, it’s dangerous.” The cycling culture here seems to be relatively restricted to those who don’t have cars and the sight of a young, well-dressed woman on a bike makes people nervous. 

People here also do not stop for pedestrians. A friend and I were in the middle of a crosswalk (one that had no light associated with us) and traffic did not stop, despite the fact that we were standing in the middle of the road. I’ve seen this happen on multiple occasions. I can’t wait to live in a real city again someday.

Fighting against private car invasion….in 1896
Some weeks ago I came across a great story in The Urban Country blog. The photograph shows the front cover of the San Francisco Call, headlining a demonstration of thousands of protesters -more than 100.000 according to the newspaper- who gathered to protest against what started to be an excessive presence of private cars in the streets of this Californian city.
More on my blog
@manufernandez

Fighting against private car invasion….in 1896

Some weeks ago I came across a great story in The Urban Country blog. The photograph shows the front cover of the San Francisco Call, headlining a demonstration of thousands of protesters -more than 100.000 according to the newspaper- who gathered to protest against what started to be an excessive presence of private cars in the streets of this Californian city.

More on my blog

@manufernandez

plantedcity:

Infographic: ‘The British Cycling Economy’
“Cycling in the UK has undergone a renaissance over the past five years, with an increasing number of people taking to the streets of the UK by bike. Structural, economic, social and health factors have caused a ‘shift in the sand’ in the UK, spurring an expansion in the cycling market with indications that this will be a longer-term trend. This growth in cycling participation has had the knock-on effect of bringing economic and social benefits to the UK. In 2010 the result was a gross cycling contribution to the UK economy of £2.9bn.”
 ~ Dr Alexander Grous, productivity and innovation specialist at the London School of Economics and lead author of the new report, ‘The British Cycling Economy: Gross Cycling Product’.
(Source: London Cyclist)

plantedcity:

Infographic: ‘The British Cycling Economy’

“Cycling in the UK has undergone a renaissance over the past five years, with an increasing number of people taking to the streets of the UK by bike. Structural, economic, social and health factors have caused a ‘shift in the sand’ in the UK, spurring an expansion in the cycling market with indications that this will be a longer-term trend. This growth in cycling participation has had the knock-on effect of bringing economic and social benefits to the UK. In 2010 the result was a gross cycling contribution to the UK economy of £2.9bn.”

 Dr Alexander Grous, productivity and innovation specialist at the London School of Economics and lead author of the new report, ‘The British Cycling Economy: Gross Cycling Product’.

(Source: London Cyclist)

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