Smart to Future Cities 2014

Smart to Future Cities 2014

The Image of the City

mbmatsqui:

Kevin Lynch. We learnt a lot about him in school. His thoughts on urbanism and the way people perceive their cities was something that was rammed down our throats as students. So it only felt natural to pass the buck and introduce a small part of his book to some lucky geography students at the…

colognecouture:

become a part of the movement » Cologne Couture «

colognecouture:

become a part of the movement » Cologne Couture «



(via goingurban)

brucesterling:

*The Power of Scientific Knowledge 

brucesterling:

*The Power of Scientific Knowledge 

resite-festival:

URBANSCALE - URBANFLOW HELSINKI 
Smart wayfinding for pedestrians. Designed by Adam Greenfield. Don’t miss him at #reSITE2014.

resite-festival:

URBANSCALE - URBANFLOW HELSINKI 

Smart wayfinding for pedestrians. Designed by Adam Greenfield. Don’t miss him at #reSITE2014.

mapsontheweb:

Location of all of the world’s metro systems

mapsontheweb:

Location of all of the world’s metro systems

(via sunlightcities)

Urbanism Hall of Fame: Jane Jacobs Inspires Sustainable, Human-Centered Cities 
Photo by ruffin_ready/Flickr.

Urbanism Hall of Fame: Jane Jacobs Inspires Sustainable, Human-Centered Cities

Photo by ruffin_ready/Flickr.

urbangeographies:

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CITIES: Neuroscience and urban planning

More than three decades ago, New York City asked pioneering urbanist William Whyte to unravel the mysteries of public space. Why do some such spaces attract crowds of happy visitors while others remain barren and empty?

Conducted with stopwatches, time-lapse videography, and simple paper charts, Whyte’s research was a spectacular success. Based on this findings, he made a series of common-sensical and easily implemented recommendations, which the city soon incorporated into its municipal construction codes.

Whyte suggested that the way to build a psychologically healthy city lay in careful observation, collection of clear data, and willingness to challenge preconceptions. Whyte’s book on The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces, and the short film based on this work, remain fresh and insightful today. They still are required reading and viewing for any student of urban life.

If Whyte’s fundamental guidelines for urban field research remain current, it is also true that new technologies are now available to those who study the workings of the urban realm. Now we can go well beyond simple observations of the overt behavior of city dwellers. We can look inside the bodies and minds of those who inhabit urban spaces.

To explore the old and new techniques of urban field research, see this article from The Guardian, which includes a short video of innovative urban methodologies. 

Where everyone in the world is migrating—in one gorgeous chart

Where everyone in the world is migrating—in one gorgeous chart

January-March 2014 blog posts

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