"This sign is meant to show which things are banned. But it actually creates the coolest dog ever." - @SimonNRicketts via @BrentToderian  

"This sign is meant to show which things are banned. But it actually creates the coolest dog ever." - @SimonNRicketts via @BrentToderian  

collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.

lorettabosence:

“They took off in airplane so they could organize the new optics of the big city. Typically on a big model, you push around with the optics until bingo you had something that looks like some wonderful composition. Brasilia, the capital of Brazil, is a great example. From the air it’s very interesting. It’s interesting for a bird or eagle. From the helicopter view, it has got wonderful districts with sharp and precise government buildings and residential buildings. However, nobody spent three minutes to think about what Brasilia would look like at the eye level. That was typical — planners were to look after the plan, the architects were to look after the buildings. With modernism, they were free of the context of the city. They placed it on open lands surrounded by grass. Nobody was responsible for looking after the people who were to move in these new structures… 
You would think that the landscape architects were the ones. At least they were down at eye level and were moving around. But as far as I’m concerned, some landscape architects have done great jobs for people, but most of the work is not great, just silly benches. They’re more occupied with plans and form. There’s a general pursuit of form in the area of architecture and also in the profession of landscape architecture. So, what really happened was that the eye level stuff were handled by the traffic engineers. They are the ones who mostly shaped our environments in our cities…
…I sum up that in 50 years nobody has systematically looked after a good urban habitat for Homo sapiens.”
Jan Gehl on cities, Brasilia and the perils of designing in plan. 
Interview with ASLA: http://www.asla.org/ContentDetail.aspx?id=31346

lorettabosence:

They took off in airplane so they could organize the new optics of the big city. Typically on a big model, you push around with the optics until bingo you had something that looks like some wonderful composition. Brasilia, the capital of Brazil, is a great example. From the air it’s very interesting. It’s interesting for a bird or eagle. From the helicopter view, it has got wonderful districts with sharp and precise government buildings and residential buildings. However, nobody spent three minutes to think about what Brasilia would look like at the eye level. That was typical — planners were to look after the plan, the architects were to look after the buildings. With modernism, they were free of the context of the city. They placed it on open lands surrounded by grass. Nobody was responsible for looking after the people who were to move in these new structures… 

You would think that the landscape architects were the ones. At least they were down at eye level and were moving around. But as far as I’m concerned, some landscape architects have done great jobs for people, but most of the work is not great, just silly benches. They’re more occupied with plans and form. There’s a general pursuit of form in the area of architecture and also in the profession of landscape architecture. So, what really happened was that the eye level stuff were handled by the traffic engineers. They are the ones who mostly shaped our environments in our cities…

I sum up that in 50 years nobody has systematically looked after a good urban habitat for Homo sapiens.”

Jan Gehl on cities, Brasilia and the perils of designing in plan.

Interview with ASLA: http://www.asla.org/ContentDetail.aspx?id=31346

My notes after reading Ambient commons. 

My notes after reading Ambient commons

Ambient commons is on my desk these days. In this book I found some great pictures to file for eventual uses in the future (mostly, that is what this tumblr is all about). 

Paris, ca. 1880, painting by Jean Beroud (Walter Art Museum/Creative Commons). Because information kiosks are not very different today, are they?

Ambient commons is on my desk these days. In this book I found some great pictures to file for eventual uses in the future (mostly, that is what this tumblr is all about). 

Paris, ca. 1880, painting by Jean Beroud (Walter Art Museum/Creative Commons). Because information kiosks are not very different today, are they?

Ambient commons is on my desk these days. In this book I found some great pictures to file for eventual uses in the future (mostly, that is what this tumblr is all about). 
See this Bulletin boards at street level, a war map on the Boston Globe storefront (1944). Because hyperlocal information is not new.

Ambient commons is on my desk these days. In this book I found some great pictures to file for eventual uses in the future (mostly, that is what this tumblr is all about). 

See this Bulletin boards at street level, a war map on the Boston Globe storefront (1944). Because hyperlocal information is not new.

alfiusdebux:

Aldo van Eyck’s playground in Zeedijk Street in Amsterdam (1955)

alfiusdebux:

Aldo van Eyck’s playground in Zeedijk Street in Amsterdam (1955)

(Source: designinthemoodforlife, via topa-tank)

Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it. Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

Douglas Adams, The salmon of doubt: hitchhiking the galaxy one last time
anxiaostudio:

A lot of comments on this article about what a mess these are, or how ugly, but I think there’s really a degree of beauty to it. Like crude imitations of spider webs. Or visual manifestations of connections between people - instead of just an open space of an urban area, showing how people are connecting. (via Photos from the Days When Thousands of Cables Crowded the Skies)

anxiaostudio:

A lot of comments on this article about what a mess these are, or how ugly, but I think there’s really a degree of beauty to it. Like crude imitations of spider webs. Or visual manifestations of connections between people - instead of just an open space of an urban area, showing how people are connecting. (via Photos from the Days When Thousands of Cables Crowded the Skies)

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